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of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
-fly zone. >> as doug luzader shows us now, the white house is trying to dial back the u.s. involvement in the mission. >> reporter: the u.s. plans to step back now from the primary leadership role in this libian operation just as the international consensus may be fraying: a reinvigorate the option in libya and a path way of a destruction of what remained of gadhafi forces that were closed in on a rebel stronghold. the pounding from u.s. and coalition forces has begun to subside. the emphasis is on locking down the air space over the libian capital. >> with the growing capabilities of the coalition, i anticipate the no-fly zone will soon extend to drega and misratta and then to tripoli. >> reporter: and some countries are questioning how this will play out. the bomb and missile attacks have gone beyond taking out anti-aircraft batteries. and while the president has not altered his latin american tour schedule, while in chile he did make clear that u.s. will soon play more of a background role. >> let me emphasize that we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and
from south korea. u.s. military ships are delivering food and relief supplies and a british rescue team is scheduled to arrive on sunday with heavy lifting equipment and 150 rescue experts and search dogs from virginia and california are on their way to japan to help right now. >>> a few people have tested positive for radiation exposure according to a report on japanese public television. they were near a nuclear facility when something inside the plant exploded shortly after the earthquake. government officials say the reactor itself was not damaged. >>> and hawaii is moving to get federal funds to help rebuild in the aftermath of the tsunami. it struck the hawaiian islands early yesterday morning, sweeping maui's coast with six-foot waves, causing millions of dollars in damage. and hawaii's governor signed a state of disaster proclamation today. >>> and in california, governor jerry brown has declared a state of emergency in four counties. in crescent city, waves topped eight feet. in northern california, one man was killed when he was swept out to sea while taking pictures of the ts
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
by general electric. 23 are now in operation across the u.s. >> this is the system that has proved unreliable. >> paul gunter tells wjz, the aging mark 1 design is unsafe and should be shut down. >> it represents not only a bad design but an aging facility. any number of events could be the match that lights the next nuclear fire. >> reporter: but a spokesman for peach bottom says comparing fukushima to his plant is problematic. but peach bottom has more numerous safety inspections. and the tsunami caused many of the problems at fukushima, an event unlikely to happen here. >> please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: advocates also point to lessons learned from the partial meltdown on nearby three-mile island in 2009. saying the industry is now safer. >> the actions taken by the industry since 3-mile island has prepared us to deal with events just like japan and maybe even worse. >> reporter: japan's nuclear crisis, has caused concern. >> that's just something you deal with every day. it makes you think twice when you hear the sirens go off. >> it doesn't need to be a tsunami
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
of a new partnership to fight distracted driving. a partnership between "consumer reports" and the u.s. department of transportation. the transportation secretary ray la hood says distracted driving killed nearly 5500 people in 2009. joran van der sloot, the key suspect in the 2005 disappearance of the american teenager natalee holloway will plead guilty to the killing of another woman last year in peru, so says his lawyer. and says the 23-year-old will argue temporary temporary insanity to try to shorten his sentence. van der sloot met with the woman while gambling last may. joran van der sloot's lawyer says he plans to argue that his client killed 21-year-old stefanie florist because she had learned of his relation to the holloway case while using his lap top. van der sloot is not formally charged in that case. a 20-year-old police chief who had accepted the job as police chief of a violent mexican border town is now without a job. garcia fired today for abandoning her post. according to a statement from the city there, the police chief had been granted permission to travel to the un
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
officials are saying about u.s. involvement in libya. a live look now at the night sky in libya. a u.s. f-15 crashes today. and right now, an investigation is wrapping up. joel brown reports for wjz on what brought that plane down. >> reporter: all that is left of the f-15 that crashed in libya, is this burned-out shell. witnesses say the two american pilots who were ejected safely, were greeted as heroes. the pentagon blames equipment failure for the crash. the two pilots aren't badly hurt and are back in american hands. it's the first major loss that u.s. officials are calling a success. >> virtually all of our targets are isolated. >> reporter: they launched another 24 missile at gadhafi's compound today. and they extended the no-fly zone over eastern libya. the u.s. is eager to hand over control of the operation. >> a transfer within a few days is likely. >> reporter: it's still not clear just who the u.s. will turn over control to. either britain, france, or nato forces could take over. still, many rebels say the job is far from done. >> reporter: the loosely- organized group of rebels,
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
as the u.s. government works to develop a strategy for rare earth minerals vital to modern electronics and weapons, one analyst is urging a free market approach. but, first, the united states and nine of its allies forged a coalition that has spent the last week in enforcing a no-fly zone over libya. it's a mission with many firsts, including the combat bay du of the multifighter jet and the royal air force has mounted a strike mission from british soil. but questions abound about the future of the operation, specifically how long it will last, who will control it and what's the end game. joining us is a man who commanded the coalition no-fly zone over northern iraq, dave datula, a retired air force general who is the services chief of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. sir, welcome back to the show. >> hey, vago, great to be here. >> the operation came together very quickly and you've been involved, obviously, in coalition no-fly operations both at the planning and operational level. what are the elements that go into and how do they work together to create a no-fly zone?
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
to support humanitarian aide. the u.s., with britain and france will continue hitting ground targets. nato could take over operations, but nato members are resisting ground operations. secretary hillary clinton will travel to london to help coordinate the strategy. the crisis in libya is prompting a protest tomorrow. >> there is a catch. >> the change that is metro is making to increase your security at rail stations. >> one of the biggest lottery jackpots in history. picture. >> psychologically t helps. it is a frosty cold. scraping the ice off the windshield, 32 at reagan, upper 20s in the rural areas this morning. mid 20s in the mountains. sun will be up in 25 minutes, by 9:00, upper 30s, climbing into the 40s by mid afternoon, increasing clouds. overnight, it will get cold again. in fact, by midnight, if you will be out for march madness this evening, layer up. by dawn, saturday, near 30 degrees. yes, still looking like a chance of snow, updated analysis, new information coming in. updated forecast for the potential for snow on sunday, in ten minutes. >> chopper 4, over gaithersburg. j
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
, delivering aid. more u.s. ships are expected today or later this week. search and rescue teams from fairfax county, virginia, are there, others from los angeles are expected in japan soon. japan's prime minister went on tv again today to assure people that every effort is being made to get to victims of this massive disaster. >> translator: so with regard to the earthquake and tsunami, i am confident that the japanese people can be united to work together to weather this difficulty. >> japan's meteorological agency says the worst may actually not be over. there's a good chance of a magnitude 7.0 or larger quake in the next three days. >>> rescue and recovery, they are japan's top two priorities right now. let's go live to the search for survivors. any sign of life where are you? >> reporter: well, randi, i can tell you that just standing and looking out the immediate rescue immediate rescue has sloan down because night has fallen. we're not hearing that many choppers on the air. the rescue crews on the ground are starting to pull back. they have to wait until daylight for the bulk of the ne
was charged. >> the attacks killed five people and sickened 17 others. >>> u.s. and coalition forces are targeting troops on the ground. but the libyan leader insists he's not going anywhere. joel brown reports for wjz from the state department. >> reporter: more coalition warplanes are flying toward libya, to control its skies. and for the first time, u.s. commanders say they're using the jets to attack gadhafi's gadhafi's troops on the ground. it may be working. in the key eastern city of misrata, gadhafi tanks are beginning to retreat, after the continuing assault on civilians. rebelts have new-- benles have -- rebels have newfound confidence. >> this is a matter of time. after one day, these tanks will surrender. >> reporter: president obama says sending in u.s. troops on the ground is absolutely out of the question. u.s. forces are already scaling back flights over libya. coalition troops are now flying more than half of the missions. bombed but not broken, moammar gadhafi appeared for the first time in public tuesday night. he rallied supportersers and portrayed himself a victi
. back to you. >> tonight, former dc school chancellor is blasting a u.s.a. report that questions whether some dc students had earned their standardized test scores. >> this report based on statistics said so many wrong students answers were erased and made to right ones. bruce johnson has been working this story and has more. bruce. >> former dc school chancellor says the u.s.a. today report lacks credibility, but you'll hear in this report that school officials at some point became so concerned after test results were changed at one school that people in charge of the testing were removed from their position. >> michelle reid will appear on national tv tonight to respond to questions raised about student test scores on her watch. >> if you look at the story overall, i think it absolutely lacks credibility. >> reid tells pbs talk show moderator there were questions raised about the high number of incorrect answers changed to correct answers. but she says an outside security firm found no wrong doing. >> when the academic achievement rates of a district like dc go up, peopl
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
with the very latest. >> reporter: this is what the u.s. and it allies are trying to stop. gadhafi forces pounding rebels in the western city of misrata. the rebels claim this video i don't was taken friday even after gadhafi announced a cease fire. in fact gadhafi seemed determined to carry out a bloody threat to retake the rebel strong hold benghazi. he said he would show no mercy and no compassion. all this prompted a grave commander in chief to issue a blunt warning. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> reporter: president obama spoke shortly after briefing 18 congressional leaders, including many wary of yet another military engagement in a ththir muslim country. but in benghazi, rebels cheered the u.n. decision to come to their rescue. >> very happy. >> reporter: as the fighting continues, the president is sending his secretary of state to paris to consult again with the allies. >> colonel gadhafi's refusal to
the massacre in 2007. when the u.s. department of education wants the school to pay $55,000. >>> and the fda is investigating potential links between dyes and preservatives in our food and hyperactivity in our children. an expert will join us in studio next to talk about the hearings today and what we might expect to get out of them. we're back in a moment. >>> a frederick county teenager is accused of bringing a loaded gun to high school in frederick. investigators say the boy was showing off a .22-caliber revolver to friends. students told a school resource deputy. the teen claims he needed it for protection after a fight on monday. >>> virginia tech has been fined for the time it took to respond to the 2007 massacre there. the university will have to pay the maximum of $55,000 for violating federal law by waiting too long to notify students during the shooting rampage. but the u.s. department of education did not impose taking some or all of its $98 million in federal student aid. one of the students shot that day is now a gun control lobbyist on the hill. he talked about the decision. >>
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
a country that has not attacked us? >> you know, i think barack obama and the u.s. is obviously in a tough place here. a country like the united states, there's a -- we have fundamental values that we are in favor of. and you know, gadhafi, you never know what he is going to do. there's always the potential of humanitarian disaster in libya. and i think that starting off with the u.n. resolution, the idea of the no-fly zone is a good start. do i believe that you need to move cautiously but i don't think the united states can just sit back and watch some terrible happening unfold in libya. >> especially if the president makes pronouncements like he has. especially the fact that he has been saying that gadhafi must go. i don't know what this has done to his credibility to not act on it. >> did the president make the right call? >> we're not doing this unilaterally. you said repeatedly on this show that the united states shouldn't go in there themselves, shouldn't be the world's policeman. >> agreed. >> we went to the u.n., particularly france, somewhat amazingly were in favor of going in the
-- the u.s. should not do this unilaterally. but at the nato summit meeting with defense ministers thursday, he needs to come out of that meeting, nato needs to come out with a plan of action that sends a clear message to gadhafi and the people around him, your days are up, the game is over. >> david, will cain here. i want to ask a question, we could be waiting on an international coalition or approval to sanction action. i've been asking this question over and over -- why would we intervene in libya, i still haven't received an answer that totally satisfies me. the most consistent one is that it would be the right thing to do because people are dying. for altruistic reasons. here's my question -- if we're looking to do the right thing, why do we need international approval to do the right thing? >> i think it's extraordinarily important especially with the president who is committed to the principles of international cooperation, collaboration, working through the u.n. i think it's extremely important that this president stick to his principles. i do think he's going to have a hard time g
. we had forums for chinese cities and mayors in chicago. we recently had u.s. eric mayors conference both in chicago, amman jordan and casablanca morocco. we had conferences for all the south america, central america and mexico canada and the united states. bringing mayors together talking about the same issues how we can work together in best practices. our global forum. we have over 28 sister cities. historically based on immigration. that was historical the wave of germans and swedes and the way eastern europeans and in turn the wave of chinese and mexicans. we had different way so historically sister cities and now we are doing business sister cities and relationship of not just our city but the metropolitan area. the relationship and how important that fits into this whole global vision for chicago in the region which is really important. revisiting china -- i will be visiting china very shortly for an almost two weeks of visiting about six or seven cities. for tourism to come to chicago and for the business community of china to make chicago the area for the center of operation
. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more than 200 people including 189 americans died in the lockerbie bombing reports that moammar gadhafi may have ordered the attack, sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. receive any bernstein's husband was on the flight. >> we have chosen to look the other way because of business interests, because for some reason we thought we could bring gadhafi into the family of civilized nations. we now know how wrong it was. >> reporter: now the u.s.
in the u.s. to congressmen and people on the left and right and journalists and think tanks and ordinary citizens and the same conclusion kept leaping out at me again and again. most americans do not realize how lucky they are you know, the political institution defined the country in many cases unique and almost all cases on usual. i'm talking about term limits, the recall mechanism, the citizens' initiative and referendum and states' rights and localism, open primaries, totally unique feature but ones that make the largest leaders answerable to the rest of us, and above all i'm talking about the direct election of almost everybody. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us, but it's these institutions growing organically growing out of the constitution that has served to keep your government more and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say there are cultural differences. we are naturally liberal people. we got away from the monarchies and the collapse is into the old world and so on. i'm afraid that explanation does not quite work. culture is and fr
calls the coalition including the u.s., canada, britain and france a group of fascists. president barack obama it is calling his trip short. it is involved in the attacks against libya and he will now not to visit maya ruins that he was supposed to see today. >>mark: the price tag for the no-fly zone is topping hundreds of millions of dollars. they have fired at least 160 missiles at a cost of one-half million dollars apiece. they have also sent and stealth bombers to bomb libya and sites. the total trip is 25 hours at an operating cost of 10,000 an hour. >> coming up we have breaking news that elizabeth taylor died. here is a live look at the james lick. traffic is moving nicely. >> of breaking news, as the killer has died.elizabeth tayloe legendary actress famed for her beauty, her jet-set lifestyle, her charitable endeavors and her many marriages, has died, her publicist told cnn wednesday. she was 79.taylor died "peacefully today in cedars-sinai hospital in los angeles." she was hospitalized six weeks ago with congestive heart failure, "a condition with which she had struggled for m
. nato officially took over command of all air operations over libya from the u.s. the labor department releases weekly figures today on unemployment benefits. that release comes ahead of the big monthly report on the jobs market. finally, a new study says the cost of health care for retirees has gone down. the steady says that a 65-year- old couple retiring this year will need about $230,000 to cover medical expenses. last year, they would've needed $250,000. fidelity expects the projection to resume its upward trend. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, muammar gaddafi. he has denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent people around the world. >> follow what leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the house and senate floor and from author leaders around the world, all online on the c-span video library. follow c-span on twitter. it is the fastest way to get updates as well as links to evens t
questions. in that same interview i asked defense secretary gates will the u.s. have been fully pulled out of this mission by the end of 2011. secretary gates says there's no one who has an answer to that question. and the american people are skeptical and have a lot of questions. this military action has a 47% approval rating. that's allow. usually when the u.s. launches a military action there's a rally around the flag. you see numbers in the 60s and 70s. the president has his work cut out for him, that's why he's speaking to the american people tonight to boost his support and explain why they're there. >> and he will emphasize that no u.s. ground troops will be used. jake, thanks very much. we'll cover the president's address, diane sawyer will anchor at 7:30 eastern. and you can see it on abc. >> anxious to hear what the president is going to say. >>> there was an unusual apology from the vice president's office after a biden staffer ushered a reporter to a storage closet to wait there. it appears that they did not want the orlando sentinel talking before the vice president shows up.
odyssey dawn? were opposition forces in libya informed by the u.s., the u.k. or france about the existence of these war games which may have encouraged them to actions leading to greater repression and a humanitarian crisis? in short, was this war against gaddafi's libya planned? or was it a spontaneous response to the great suffering which gaddafi was visiting upon his opposition? congress hasn't even considered this possibility. nato, which has now taken over enforcement of the no-fly zone, has more from an organization which pledged mutual support to defend north atlantic states from aggression, they've moved from that to military operations reaching from libya to the chinese border in afghanistan. north atlantic treaty organization. we need to know and we need to ask what role french air force general and current supreme allied commander of nato for transportation may have played in the development of operation southern storm and in discussions with the u.s. and the expansion of the u.n. mandate into a nato operation. what has been the role of the u.s. african command and central comma
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
by the earthquake in japan. the u.s. geological survey says japan's main island was moved by eight feet. a little more than two meters. an 8.9 magnitude quake. the national institute of geovicics and volcanology estimates it shifted the earth on its axis by four inches. mind boggling. >> it is. we have some of the worst hit areas before and after the quake. these pictures show us the scope of the devastation. josh levs has that for us. >> a lot of people have been waiting for pictures to start coming out. brand new ones for you all this morning. let's do this before the screen. i want to go to the video. a bird's eye view sort of thing. nhk. sendai before and after. we're seeing this video from above. very stark there. take a look here. about a dozen sites that were affected. zoom in on the screen here. this came to me from google this is a before image from one place inside sendai. i'll let it play. you will see town after town, villages after villages. from green to dark browne many where homes have been destroyed. large areas of grass are just gone. this is yuragi and nartori. dozens s pictur
around a number of states and spoke to a series of people in the u.s. senators to congressman to beat on the left and right, journalists, and tanks, to ordinary citizens. the same preclusion kept leaping out again and again. most americans don't realize how lucky they are. you know, the political institutions that define this country are in many cases unique in almost all cases talking about the term, the recall mechanism. the initiative and referendum ballots procedure. i'm talking about states rights. i'm talking about open primaries in a totally unique feature, but one that makes legislatures answerable to the rest of us. and above all i'm talking about almost everybody from the share to the school board. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us. but it's these institutions growing organically out of the constitution that is serve to keep your government and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say well, there are cultural difference is. we are naturally people who got away from the monarchies and closets of the old world. i'm afraid that explan
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
on the american revolution, "liberty," are so wonderful. i use that in my high school u.s. history classes. >> guest: that's wonderful. >> host: and this tweet is from a middle school history teacher. it seems it is not possible to determine original intent. your thoughts, please, and that's from chris. >> guest: well, depends on what you mean by original intent. as i've said earlier, scalia said he is not interested in original intent, that is that he's not interested in what people meant to say which is very difficult to determine. but in what they say in the meaning of the words of a given statute. i think, i think that it is useful to look, for jurists to look at what either the drafters or the ratifiers said about given provisions of the constitution. there you can, i think, find information that is of use. there is no original intent, there is no original understanding of the constitution as a whole, but usually the questions are much more specific. and you can find some information, but i see no reason to think that we are bound to understand those or to continue the provisions, to
. >>> and for more on this, let's turn to the u.s. ambassador for the united nations, susan rice. good morning, ambassador rice. you saw the interview with christiane amanpour. yesterday, you called gadhafi delusional, accused of slaughtering his own people. he's continuing to attack rebel forces today. you listen to him and he sounds like a man who's not willing to go. are you hearing anything through diplomatic channels that he can be persuaded to go? or is this a fight to the death? >> good morning, george. good to be with you. i think the international community has joined with the people of libya, expressing their outrage at the killing and slaughtering and the frankly crazy behavior we've seen out of colonel gadhafi. the international community is going to keep the pressure on. the european union adopted strong sanctions yesterday, joining the united states, which has seized $30 billion in gadhafi-related assets. there's military contingency planning for humanitarian and other contingenciecontingencies. we're going to keep the pressure on gadhafi until he steps down and allows people to
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
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